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DROUGHT REGULATIONS UPDATE

As required by the State Water Resources Control Board regulations adopted on May 18, 2016, Zone 7 is posting information on the volumes of water Zone 7 expects to deliver to each of the urban water suppliers over the next three years, assuming three additional years of drought. The result of the analysis indicates that Zone 7 will be able to meet both Municipal and Industrial (M&I) demands for potable water, as well as agricultural demands for raw water, at the end of the assumed three-year drought.

Wholesaler Supply Information

Supporting documents:


On June 15, 2016, in light of an imporved water supply picture, Zone 7's Board of Directors voted to lift the Agency's 2-year-old local state of drought emergency, but to maintain a voluntary 10% conservation target to encourage and promote wise use of water.

The action follows new regulations by the State Water Resources Control Board that allow water agencies to self-certify water supplies assuming an additional three years of drought and, on that basis, determine whether any mandatory conservation should be required this year.

Zone 7's self-assessment using the state's guidelines indicates that Zone 7 will be able to meet both Municipal and Industrial demands for treated water, as well as agricultural demands for untreated water, even assuming the drought continues over the next three years (2017-2019). To view the assessment, see "Drought Regulations Update" above.

"The calculations demonstrate that no mandatory conservation is necessary from June 2016 through January 2017 ..." according to a staff report that went to the  Board. This is due to successful conservation efforts by the public from 2014 through the present and a signficant increase in the amount of water available this year.

March 2016 storms brought much-needed snow to the Sierras, and state reservoirs received significant inflow. This prompted the California Department of Water Resources to issue a final State Water Project allocation of 60 percent -- the highest since 2012.

While lifting the local drought emergency, Zone 7 encourages continuing wise use of water and is calling for voluntary 10% conservation. State prohibitions to prevent waste and unreasonable use of water remain in effect, as well as the long-term target of achieving a 20 percent reduction in per-capita water use by 2020.

The state prohibitions include actions primarily related to the outdoor use of treated water:

  1. The application of potable water to outdoor landscapes in a manner that causes runoff such that water flows onto adjacent property, non-irrigated areas, private and public walkways, roadways, parking lots, or structures;
  2. The use of a hose that dispenses potable water to wash a motor vechicle, except where the hose is fitted with a shut-off nozzle or device that causes it to cease dispensing water immediately when not in use;
  3. The application of potable water to driveways and sidewalks;
  4. The use of potable water in a fountain or other decorative water feature, except where the water is part of a recirculating system;
  5. The application of potable water to outdoor landscapes during and within 48 hours after measurable rainfall;
  6. The serving of drinking water other than upon request in eating or drinking establishments, including but not limited to restaurants, hotels, cafes, cafeterias, bars, or other public places where food and drink are served and/or purchased.
  7. The irrigation with potable water of ornamental turf on public street medians; and
  8. The irrigation with potable water of landscapes outside of newly constructed homes and buildings in a manner inconsistent with regulations or other requirements established by the California Building Standards Commission and Department of Housing and Community Development.